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The Expert in Baby Boomer Travel

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Baby boomer travel

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Thanks to the hiking site Riders Trail for this informative and entertaining infographic on hiking safely with a dog.

Dogs need walking, of course, which provides exercise for both canine and human, but hiking with your dog can take the benefits of exercise to a new level, for baby boomers and younger generations alike.

Still, there are a number of considerations to keep in mind before you leash up your pet, and Riders Trail does a good job of highlighting them:

  • Making sure your dog is suitable for hiking
  • Finding dog-friendly hiking locations
  • Preparing your dog for hiking
  • Adhering to trail etiquette
  • Carrying along the right supplies
  • And dealing with potential threats

Plus, the dog pictures are downright cute. Even if you don’t have a dog, you may enjoy checking them out.

How To Safely Hike With Your Dog

NOTE: If you’d like further information on this topic, Riders Trail has a detailed print version of the… Continue reading
Christ the Redeemer Statue overlooks all of Rio from Corcovado mountain. Photo from riodejaneiro.com.

Rio de Janeiro is one port on an Oceania cruise to South America. Photo from riodejaneiro.com.

Oceania is near the top of my list of favorite cruise lines.

It features mid-sized ships, in the 600 to 1,250 passenger range, interesting itineraries covering much of the world, and terrific food — or, as their ads put it, “the finest cuisine at sea.” In my experience — which includes two Oceania Mediterranean cruises — this is no exageration.

Oceania cruises are ideal for baby boomers — the atmosphere onboard is refined and the passengers tend to be older adults.

The cruise line is rolling out two new ships, one in 2022 and another in 2025, the first two in its new 1,200-passenger Allura-Class line.

And now for the good news: Oceania is currently conducting a contest to name the 2022 ship, with a top prize of a free inaugural cruise for two… Continue reading

You may want to eat your turkey at home next year.Here are the answers to the Happy Thanksgiving Day Quiz in my most recent post.  Let me know how you did!

1.Which historical figure is most identified with Thanksgiving in America?

a. The Earl of Cranberry

b. Davy Crockett

c. The Sultan of Turkey

d. Governor William Bradford

Answer: D — Governor William Bradford of Plymouth Colony, who is said to have declared the colony’s first Thanksgiving feast in 1621.

 

2. Who  invented the green bean casserole, and when?

Dorcas Reilly's recipe has sold countless cans of mushroom soup.

Dorcas Reilly’s recipe has sold countless cans of mushroom soup.

a. Betty Crocker in 1949

b. Dorcas Reilly in 1955

c.  Fanny Farmer in 1930

d. Julia Child in 1963

Answer: B — Dorcas Reilly in 1955. Reilly was a product developer for the Campbell Soup Company, where she came up with the idea for green bean casserole, which of course uses Campbell’s cream of mushroom soup.… Continue reading

How many Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving?

How many Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving?

Yes, it’s time for another Thanksgiving Day Quiz, in which we delve into the history and mystery of this beloved and occasionally berated travel-related holiday, when most everyone in the United States either heads to Grandma’s house or Grandma flees to the buffet at Golden Corral.

Either way, there’s bound to be turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce, potatoes, gravy, green bean casserole, pumpkin pie and at least one relative who hits the sauce too much, cranberry or otherwise. It’s a quintessential American holiday, epitomized by gluttonous portions of food, football, parades, family, friends, and, of course, traffic jams and overcrowded airports.

But how much do you really know about it? Here’s the quiz, and Happy Thanksgiving!

Cranberries

Cranberries

1. Which historical figure is most identified with Thanksgiving in America?

a. The Earl of Cranberry

b. Davy Crockett

c. The Sultan of Turkey

d. Governor William… Continue reading

I’m pleased to announce that my latest book,  Secret Tucson, has been published by Reedy Press of St. Louis and is now available for purchase at Tucson area bookstores, online at Amazon.com, or from Reedy Press.

What’s Secret Tucson about? The subtitle, A Guide to the Weird, Wonderful, and Obscure says it all, though I would add you’ll find such nuggets as:

What one time New York crime boss spent his last decades in Tucson?

Why does the Beatles’ classic song “Get Back” include a nod to Tucson?

Why is Tucson a must stop on many treasure hunters’ maps — and where can you search for a fortune in gold?

Where was John Dillinger captured in Tucson in 1934 after a series of blunders by his gang?

What locale is home to both the country’s southernmost ski resort and a World War II Japanese-American relocation camp?… Continue reading

The Garden of Earthy Delights, by Hieronymous Bosch

First setting eyes on The Garden of Earthly Delights, by Hieronymous Bosch, was for me a numinous experience

Previously, I wrote about hodophobia: the fear of travel, and some ways to conquer it.

Today’s topic is a bit more fun and upbeat: some less-known — and generally quite obscure — terms that reflect the essence of the love and fascination of travel. (Some aren’t confined strictly to travel, but offer insight into it.)  Some of the terms are from English, and some from other languages.

The latter are particularly interesting to me because they capture some nuances that English does not. (And because of that, I may miss some of that nuance — so if you’re among the native Portuguese, German, or Swedish speakers who follow this blog, please free to correct me.)

Let’s start with a pure travel term that’s the opposite of hodophobia: hodophilia.

Hodophilia (English,… Continue reading

A Greek ferry leaving Piraeus for the islands. Photo by Clark Norton

Fear of ship travel can be one aspect of hodophobia. Photo by Clark Norton

When my family and I lived on City Island, New York, a little island in the Bronx that’s the farthest northeast point in New York City,  our next door neighbor  — a born and bred City Island resident then in her 60s or 70s — made a startling confession: she had only once in her life ventured into Manhattan, and that was to visit a friend in the hospital there.

If you walked a short distance down the street from the little complex of cottages where we lived, you could enjoy a panoramic view of the Manhattan skyline. I was shocked to learn that that alone had not lured her into New York’s best-known borough — much less the cultural opportunities, the restaurants, and all the sights that people traveled to Manhattan from around… Continue reading

Winnemucca Lake, Alpine County, California. Photo by Catharine Norton

What, a place in California where there are hardly any people — and yet is so strikingly beautiful that it’s been called the Switzerland of California?

OK, I’ll ‘fess up — I’m the one who called it the Switzerland of California, as I hiked recently along a mountain trail bordering meadows blanketed with wildflowers and sporting gorgeous views of 11,000-foot peaks that still displayed pockets of snow in early August.

And its very name — Alpine County — certainly evokes Switzerland as well, as does its semi-official nickname, the “California Alps.”

The area was first explored by non-native Americans when John C. Fremont and his scout, Kit Carson, passed through in  1844. Soon after came contingents of Mormon settlers and gold prospectors, and much later still vacationers and second-home owners.

Alpine County isn’t very large — it’s the eighth smallest… Continue reading

If it’s Tuesday, this must be the Rue de Bouchers in Brussels. Photo from Shutterstock.

Today’s guest post, by Canadian resident Robert Waite, argues that baby boomers should slow down a bit in pursuing bucket list items and spend more quality time in a destination to absorb the culture and life of the people there.

As Bob told me, his piece is meant to stir debate,  and I found myself debating his points within my own mind —  which is exactly what a good piece of journalism should provoke.

I’ll share my opinions on this topic in a later post, but for now I’ll yield the floor to Bob:

By Robert Waite

Those of us of a certain age might recall the film “If It’s Tuesday, This Must be Belgium,” a 1969 United Artists release that poked fun at American tourists for their penchant for rushing from European… Continue reading

Woodstock Memorial at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts. Richie Havens' name appears first. Photo by Clark Norton

A Woodstock Memorial commemmorates the festival at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located on the concert site. Photo by Clark Norton

It was the cultural touchstone of my generation — three days of peace, love, and, of course, music, mud, and skinny-dipping.

Somewhere between 400,000 and 500,000 young people somehow made their way to Max Yasgur’s farm in New York’s Catskills, drawn by almost mysterious forces that seemed to transcend even the lure of hearing Jimi, Janis, Joan Baez, Joe Cocker, Country Joe and the Fish, and Jefferson Airplane perform at the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair, as it was formally known.

Fifty years later, the joke goes, at least ten times that many aging baby boomers swear they were at Woodstock, too — perhaps aided by memories of watching the movie and listening to the soundtracks while engulfed in a smoky haze appropriate to the occasion.

I… Continue reading

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According to government and private surveys:

  • Leading-edge baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1955) and seniors account for four out of every five dollars spent on luxury travel today.
  • Roughly half the consumer spending money in the U.S.--more than $2 trillion--is in the hands of leading-edge baby boomers and seniors.
  • Baby boomers (born 1946-1964) travel more than any other age group.
  • When asked what they would most like to spend their money on, baby boomers answered “travel” more than any other category, including improving their health or finances.

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