Google Analytics Alternative

The Expert in Baby Boomer Travel

Travel Copywriter
The kitchen at the Cocomama hostel in Amsterdam.  Photo from Cocomama.

The kitchen at the Cocomama hostel in Amsterdam. Photo from Cocomama.

Decades ago, when baby boomers were in their 20s and backpacking around Europe, many discovered the joys of staying in youth hostels. The main joy is that they were cheap — really cheap — but they were also good places to meet like-minded travelers, pick up some budget travel tips from them, and maybe even make some new friends in a foreign city.

There were drawbacks: some hostels wouldn’t allow access to your room for several hours during the day; the rooms most often sported dormitory-like accommodations, complete with bunk beds for up to a dozen people, making privacy nonexistent; the bathrooms and showers were invariably down the hall (though so were those in inexpensive European hotels and pensions back in the day); cleanliness was often in short supply; and there was always the possibility of getting your possessions ripped off by unscrupulous roommates, since security was at a minimum.

As baby boomers have aged, their tolerance for hostels has understandably waned, though it’s not unusual to find older travelers using them these days.

Especially now, since in the past few years there’s been a mini-explosion of “luxury” hostels throughout Europe.

I came across a 185-page e-book detailing many of these hostels at the website budgettraveller.org. It’s called, appropriately enough, Luxury Hostels of Europe, and it’s available as a free download if you sign up for their newsletter.

You’ll find detailed descriptions of these hostels — which come complete, in some cases, with chic “boutique” design elements; private rooms, many en suite; indoor pools and saunas; restaurants, bars and nightclubs; and fashionable addresses in cities throughout the continent.

Copenhagen, Berlin, Dublin, Prague, Florence, Amsterdam, Barcelona, London, Reykjavik, Lisbon, Madrid, Budapest, Edinburgh, Paris — the list goes on.

As you might expect, prices at these luxury hostels aren’t as rock-bottom as they once were — what is? — but they tend to be less expensive than hotels, sometimes much less expensive. And, in the “best” ones — meaning those that honor the hostel tradition — they still serve as good meeting places for value-conscious travelers.

Of course, you’ll pay less if you share a room, but these hostels are mostly reasonably priced even for private rooms.

This, it seems to me, is a good example of an old — and perhaps somewhat worn-out — travel institution reinventing itself to meet new needs.

And one of those needs — a big one — is catering to travelers of baby boomer age who want to recapture some of the old magic of staying in hostels and meeting other like-minded travelers, but without having to stay in overcrowded dormitory rooms and use bathrooms with questionable levels of sanitation.

I applaud the trend, and, having just downloaded the free e-guide to these luxury hostels myself, I intend to use it on my next trip to Europe.

 

Be sure to download my free report, “How to Ride the Coming Wave of Boomers,” available here. It’s all about the best ways to market travel to baby boomers — the biggest-spending group of travelers the world has ever seen. It’s also the easiest way to subscribe to my blog, so you won’t miss a posting. Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Responses to New Breed of Luxury Hostels Beckons Boomers

  • So what’s the difference between these luxury hostels and small hotels we are all familiar with?

  • The luxury hostels are, on average, cheaper. In Copenhagen, a small hotel can run you around 200 euros a night, whereas a luxury hostel might cost 80 to 120 euros. The hostels also pride themselves on being less impersonal than hotels with hotel staffs that are up on all the doings going on around town, and generally fostering more of a community feeling among their guests.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Auto Europe Car Rental

retirees_raise-2015-v2-300x250

Save

Save

Save

Save

Sign up to follow my blog


 Follow me on Twitter
 Connect on Facebook
 Amazon Author page
 Connect on LinkedIn
 Circle me on Google+

Travel Writing Blogs

Save

Getting On Travel Top Boomer Travel Blog 2018 Badge

2014Seal_Gold

Baby

Top Senior Adventures Blog

Save

retirees_raise-2015-v2-300x250

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Best Baby Boomer Travel Blogs in 2015

image001

NATJA SEAL-Gold winner

According to government and private surveys:

  • Leading-edge baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1955) and seniors account for four out of every five dollars spent on luxury travel today.
  • Roughly half the consumer spending money in the U.S.--more than $2 trillion--is in the hands of leading-edge baby boomers and seniors.
  • Baby boomers (born 1946-1964) travel more than any other age group.
  • When asked what they would most like to spend their money on, baby boomers answered “travel” more than any other category, including improving their health or finances.

Auto Europe Car Rental